Trying a new language won’t solve your development problems. 

I’ve had a conversation where someone proposes trying a new language like Go or Scala or Typescript for new development several times. Typically, the argument is that we have problems x, y and z with our current language and they would all be better under $new_language. The arguments are always things like x has better performance, y has better typing, z is more functional. 

There is no free lunch within modern programming languages. There are no opportunities to switch to a new language without paying new costs. Java requires a lot of boiler plate and is very heavy weight. Typescript is async by default and has non-reliable typing. Go has a litany of problems (tool chain, exceptions, generics, etc) downstream of Google making all the serious decisions for the language. Rust is very strict and gives you excess performance you can’t use. 

Switching between any of the modern languages means trading some benefits for some negatives. Unless you have a serious problem with your current language you are unlikely to gain anything. 

An exception is switching from Ruby, or Python to something like Java or Go. Then you would gain a lot of performance. But first ask yourself whether any of your services max out a single server. Are you even using instances larger than your laptop? Can the performance problem be solved by a refactor and re-architecture in the same language? Re-writing is time consuming and if your team already knows Ruby a re-architect in the same language will usually be faster and produce better code. 

Programming languages have trade offs. Switching is an expensive process. It always takes longer and costs more than you expect. And after it all by switching languages you are just switching old problems for new problems. 

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